Sunday, May 19, 2013

Meridian Idaho Temple Rendering

I have been asked to give some of my thoughts on the newly released rendering of the Meridian Idaho Temple.  So here they are:
Meridian Idaho Temple Rendering

My first impression of this temple is strength.  The side towers look weighty and strong with small windows.  The double columns in the central mass between windows adds to the feeling of strength, as does the central tower without a spire.The base appears to be a slight pedestal, adding to the effect.

At the same time, I notice the finer details above windows, on columns, along the top edges, surrounding the octagonal pyramidal apex, etc.  These show the finer beauty of the temple and help to temper the look of strength.  I notice that many of the details are either copied from the Cardston Alberta Canada Temple, or modified from it (which I am fine with).  In fact, the overall look of the temple including the lack of a spire, appears to be based on the Cardston Alberta Canada Temple.  I like the finer details in the stonework or precast concrete that we are seeing in newer temples.  This rendering appears to show a precast concrete exterior.

Viewing this rendering, I wonder how the rooms will be arranged in the temple.  I would guess that some corner towers will have staircases.  I also assume that the central tower will house the Celestial Room, which would be nice because with windows on four sides light will flow into the room no matter where the sun is in the sky.

I like the octagonal pyramid.  I read reports saying that this was a dome, but it is clearly not, it is a shallow pyramid with 8 sides.  I like the gold on this pyramid.  I think it would have been cool to see the four corner towers topper with similar shallow pyramids, but the way it is rendered now works well.

I also like that there appears to be art glass, although until it is built it will be hard to tell what the glass looks like.

So I generally like the rendering of this temple and am excited to see the interior.  I am also interested to know what any of you think about it.






33 comments:

Aaron Sebright said...

Hey there! I actually had the opportunity to meet with the Temple Architect who designed this Temple, and I happen to know that this temple is using a 3 ordinance room layout, with two "A" ordinance rooms leading into a single "B" ordinance room. And it was intended to borrow heavily from the Cardston Temple, and earlier versions had it looking more angular and more resembling the Cardston Temple. And the Celestial room is in the Central tower with the staircases in the corners.

Cliff P said...

Scott, great insights, as always. I hadn't even thought about what the interior layout might be like, but your observations sound spot on.

Brian J said...

We agree on the concept of strength; thanks for pointing out the tempering aspects. My first thought upon seeing the rendering was that this temple is vaguely reminiscent of the gold depository at Fort Knox, Kentucky.

Brett Stirling said...

I am very excited about the direction the new temples are taking. This with the new Japan temple are my favourites. I am also excited about the interior to see what detailing and features are featured and what the mura(s) might look like in ordinance room A.

Elaine Edwards said...

I just found your blog. I am so glad I did. It's wonderfully written very well researched. Thanks for posting it!

dSquared said...

I am hoping someone comes in on July 11th and says we want a higher steeple. Maybe reverse psychology, but my un-artistic, un-inspired reaction is that it just isn't right.

Karl said...

I would personally leave the steeple as is, and take Moroni off.

I would love to see the Church tip their hats to the "Pioneer" temple designs.

Brett Stirling said...

I will write this here as I couldn't find a post on the new Provo City Temple. I was looking at one of the floor plans on this site http://www.heraldextra.com/special-section/tabernacletotemple/photos-provo-city-center-temple-plans/collection_b12aa3c6-f0d0-11e2-af0c-001a4bcf887a.html#5 and can't seem to understand the flow of rooms. It seems as though you would go through the veil and end up in a lobby area and then have to either walk up the stairs or take the elevator to the Celestial Room. Does this make sense to anyone?

Anonymous said...

It's hard to see based off of the plan, but the Daily Herald said that the room on the right of the celestial room is an ordinance room; I'm not sure if the one on the left is. Either way, the temple is going to be full progressive (creation, garden, world and terrestrial rooms), so it could be one of the other rooms.

Brian J said...

Thanks for the Lind, Brett. It appears that, for some reason, the Celestial Room is labeled as a lobby in those images. On image 5 you can also see that the top center sealing room is labeled both as a sealing room ans an instruction room.

I also see that the sealing room at the top center of photo 4 has a "closet" with what appears to be a basin or sink. We have discussed that feature in comments to another thread.

Scott said...

Plans usually list the Celestial Room as a lobby. Endowment rooms are usually listed as instruction room A and B. I think this is just to avoid questions from the construction workers, city planners, etc.

Jordan W. said...

The Ada County government has made a planning document available that has floor plans of the Meridian Temple. It is a very large and detailed .pdf file (259 pages, including technical blueprints for the entire site). The floor plans are on pages 42-46.

http://www.adaweb.net/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=2XO3853v1jQ%3d&tabid=1216

Of particular note is that the Celestial Room "lobby" doesn't appear to receive any outside light directly. It spans the second and third levels, in the core of the temple. There is a room above it on the mechanical/penthouse level, which has windows to the outside, visible as the windows just below the central pyramid roof, but this room is not shown in any detail on the available floor plans. It is only discernible in the section diagram on p. 42. Of the three main staircases in the Northwest, Northeast, and Southeast corners, only the Northeast one is shown as continuing up beyond the third floor. Those are the only indications that the "tower room," as I'm gonna call it, exists. As far as I can tell, none of the sealing rooms have an extra "closet" attached to them.

So I have my guess as to the potential purpose of that tower room being an additional sealing room/Holy of Holies. Another possibility is that it might potentially contain a glass floor that would let natural daylight into the Celestial Room, but I don't know if that's ever been done in another temple before.

Brian J said...

Look a little closer, Jordan. On page 46 of the document, page 14 of exhibit 4, there is a small room with a sink just off "Instruction 1," the big sealing room.

Your observations regarding the Celestial Room are interesting; interesting enough that I might make a 20 hour round trip drive for the open house!

Brett Stirling said...

@Jordan,thank you for this wonderful resource. It is interesting to compare the different floor plans, especially one that clearly shows the new 2 A and 1 B Ordinance rooms configuration.

One room that caught my eye on the basement level is the shop. What do you think that is referring to?

This is a large temple, I am always interested in comparing the small temples with their simplified floor plans to ones such as this.

I agree the tower room is a mystery. it could be used as a lantern as there is not direct source of natural light into the celestial room as you pointed out. Hmmm...I can't wait to see photos of the finished product.

Jeff Sorensen said...

Just discovered this blog, and looked through all your posts back to the beginning! Thanks for all the great and interesting posts!

Jordan W. said...

@ Brian J: Oooh, thanks for pointing that out! I had not actually bothered to zoom in on the plans, so I didn't even see it!

@ Brett Stirling: Perhaps the Shop room is a Beehive Clothing store. Some temples have them nearby, in a separate building on the same property. I know that's the case with Los Angeles and San Diego. Are there any temples we know of that include one built in?

Either that, or it's a mechanic's shop of some sort. I know when I went to put up Christmas lights at Los Angeles, they opened some exterior doors to the basement near the loading dock, where a lot of supplies were kept. It looked like a janitorial/landscape/repair shop inside.

I can't imagine any other purpose for it... certainly not a gift shop! ;)

Chris London said...

Hey Scott, I love your website. I've been looking for a way to contact you directly but i can't seem to find one. I was wondering if you had any insight into the meaning behind the square pattern that can be found all over the outside of the LA temple. Thanks!

Brett Stirling said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Brett Stirling said...

@Jordan W A mechanical or maintenance shop does make more sense than an actual shop.

I would love to go to an open house and do a session in this one or the Payson Utah or the Gilbert Arizona Temples.

Bob said...

Scott... The Washington DC temple has an impressive external east facing door but the inside portion of that is a small door marked "Exit". I understand that Christ is supposed to enter the temple through the East Door. Can you do an article about East Facing temple doors and the symbolism associated with them?
Bob

Tyler said...

Came across this quite by accident, and it seems like it'd be interesting to you and others.
Interior renderings and floorplans of the Philadelphia Temple:

http://rondamiles.com/139220/1374845/feature-projects/latter-day-saints-philadelphia-temple

Brett Stirling said...

@Tyler Thank you for that site. The design is sublime. It takes the heritage theme of Brigham City even further. There are two interesting features in the patron change rooms: a) clothing distribution and b) small instruction rooms. I have noticed b on any other temple design. Does anyone know what they are for? Certainly not for workers as their change rooms and training room are on a seperate floor. Also the patron change rooms take up an entire floor, looks almost the size of a small temple like the one in Melbourne.

Brett Stirling said...

I meant haven't seen....aaaarrrrggghh iPhone typing! >_<

PS The interior designs of temples are becoming a lot more ornate than previous designs like the Gila Valley and the Oquirrh Mountain Temples. I wonder if it is a paradigm change for all new temples or specifically just for a select few special temples. I can't wait to see the Rome temple interior and surrounding complex when done.

Tyler said...

@Brett-
A lot of rooms on temple floorplans are called instruction rooms, as mentioned above this is probably to avoid confusion on the part of building officials and others who use the plans during planning and construction...

The 'instruction rooms' with dashed lines forming smaller squares look to be initiatory areas, there is another 'instruction room' off the dressing area which shows seating that is probably an actual instruction room, I remember sitting in a similar room with a member of the temple pres. for some explanation of what to expect before my endowment and again before my wedding.

Brett Stirling said...

@tyler Yes, was referring to the second small instruction room to the side. That makes sense. I was expecting that, but as we only have small temples here in Australia, space is at a premium so that is done in the temple president's office.

Anonymous said...

What can you tell about this interesting glass windows in Freiberg Germany temple? http://deannalw.blogspot.com/2012/09/freiberg-germany-temple-trip.html

Anonymous said...

Reply to sealing room closet. Page 46 shows a small closet on the bottom side of the large sealing room on the right.

Anonymous said...

Reply to sealing room closet. page 46 shows a small closet at the bottom of the large sealing room on the right side.

Greenbean said...

Does anyone have copies of the files mentioned for the Meridian or Philidelphia plans (from Jordan W or Tyler's comments). The links no longer seem to work. A link or an email (to keenhuskier at gmail dot com) would be greatly appreciated.

Brian said...

Scott, do you have some kind of Database that you keep track of all your information for temples in? (I have one I am working on, including temple plans and all kinds of interior photos I have collected, was wondering if you wanted to trade info?)

Brad Greenwood said...

It's a beautiful building, as Mormon temples go... but the goofy stuff occurring inside kind of ruins the whole thing.

Eric said...

If you like to consider LDS architecture, you might also like http://architecturalsolution.com/arch/potential-of-architecture/ Much to say on all these posts and peoples comments. It's positive that people are interested in the issues of design. The Church and its people have the potential to produce architecture (and works in the other arts and sciences) that are so much more (every good category: meaningful, efficient, honest, etc) than we are currently, as per the Joseph Smith prophesy quoted in the first paragraph of the linked article above. Stay zealous, true and real.

Matt Deaton said...

Does anyone still have a copy of the detailed plans for the Meridian temple?